The many faces of Escapade

After I retired from the corporate world, I had a lot of fun testing sewing patterns. One that really caught my attention is the Escapade from 5 out of 4 patterns. It is simple, and very cleverly designed. Sews up quickly and is pretty fabric conservative. Swim top, casual bra (or both) nightgown, dress (or both) or cami/tank top, love the versatility that this pattern offers. You can have fun with the straps too. What follows are a lot of photos of me in the variations of escapade. You’ve been warned!

5 out of 4 Patterns Escapade info

The first one I made in testing was from a thrifted jersey sheet and a bit of polka dot cotton lycra I had in my stash. This is a very casual fit photo of that one. I wear it as a night gown. Turns out the Flamingo print is from a sought after print designer. I often water the garden first thing in the summer. Hope that the neighbors assume this is a cute summer dress.

In keeping with the night gown theme, I used Tricot to make this blue one, with a slightly fuller skirt. Just added a few inches to the front and back of the skirt and pleated center front and either side of the back.

Nylon Tricot Escapade with additional width added to “skirt” to form pleats. I need more colors of this style!

With a little more length in a light weight cotton lycra and contrast ties, a fun summer dress. There is a light purple athletic knit dress version somewhere in the closet.

Nick of Time Fabrics has a 92/8 Cotton Lycra that made a great layering/set with the Ultimate Bikini Bottoms. I like the upward curve of the bikini bottoms for extra tummy coverage. I modified the top to have just elastic shirring, without ties, and fixed straps. I bought a few colors to make this with, and could only find this photo. There is a hot pink version that saw a lot of wear with and Annabeth over when the weather was cooler.

This is a simple version with elastic shirring made from supplex perfect under summer whites.

Inspired by the Ultimate Bikini Bottoms that are reversible, I wrote about making this Nylon Spandex Tricot Version reversible too.

I stitched up some matching tricot Lola shorts to wear as a coverup to the pool.

And a Nylon Spandex Tricot version for more summer white tops.

The swim version made in testing from purple black and red swim scraps.

With a reversible top.

The Cotton Lycra Tardis version with Rad Panel Undies for fun.

And most recently, an athletic space dyed knit to go with Candy Shorts. As a mothers day gift for my daughter. Cause hanging out at the pool in an escapade and Candy Shorts will be the thing to do once school is out.

I sure have had fun making and wearing my Escapades since testing. You should try one too! The links in this post are my affiliate links. I may receive a small commission from the pattern designer if you use them to purchase a pattern. I appreciate your support, and happy sewing!

A Word (or two) on Wanda

I had so much fun testing the Jackie Jumpsuit from 5 out of 4 patterns, I jumped on board with testing the Wanda with all its puffed sleeve glory that would even please Anne Shirley. Truth told, I have been wanting to make puffed sleeves for a while and even tried some modifications on the Easy Tee. The adult version of Wanda is here.

Wanda #1

The pattern calls for a four way stretch. The first version I made used a vintage striped jersey to go with the vintage feel of the pattern. Plus the fabric was sitting there. I have a sweatshirt fleece that matches the lavender stripe, and may make some Jason Joggers from that, or an Adventure skort.

The stripes stretch, but without lycra, only moderately so. The bands are cotton lycra. Next time I will use a more narrow band to go with the delicate puff of sleeve.

Sleeves. I am an avid top stitcher. I like to install knit sleeves flat and top stitch around the armscye. First, for the look and secondly for more durability. 5 out of 4 patterns call for sleeves to be sewn in the round. I found a happy medium with the method of sewing partial seams.

I had a little left of the leopard and stripes, and used it for my second version. It is a European organic cotton I bought for making capsule outfits for this little one. Excited to try it on next time we get together. In the meantime, here is a Flatlay.

This is part of an order from Bow Button Fabrics last fall.


First the sleeve. I was over the moon that it had notches. Notches are often an overlooked key in getting a garment put together nicely. There is a front and back notch as well as one at the top of the sleeve. I marked the back notch with a red dot. There are corresponding notches on the bodice front and back.

Cut out with scissors, please pardon the less than smooth edges. Don’t quite trust myself with a rotary cutter yet. The sewing coach in me assured the concerned photographer that it will all be serged off anyway, so don’t fret the small stuff.

There are many ways to gather. I was taught to sew two parallel lines of stitching (between the notches) on the longest stitch. I started with the deeper basting seam, then had trouble sewing the narrower basting seam. Sleeve on left. Going forward I will sew the more narrow seam first. Sleeve on right.

Sew and top stitch shoulder seams. Then pin or clip the notches of the sleeve to the notches of the bodice. Front back and center.
Pull the gathering threads so that the fullness is evenly distributed between the pins. In the photo above, you can see the two straight gathering stitches, with my zig zag basting of the sleeve puff between the straight stitches. This is the partial seam method. Just sew this from front to back notch. After this was sewn, I was able to remove the exposed gathering stitch line. It just zipped right out!

After both sleeves are partially sewn in with a zig zag baste. Clean finish the bottom sleeve and bodice edges. Open up the top and stitch side seams of sleeves and bodice. Photo below, shows the right side seams finished. Be sure to sew both. I snuck the neckband on in this step. More on that below.

Tuck the sleeves inside the body of the garment, pin or clip the underarm seams (facing different directions for less bulk). then serge around the armscye. Since 2/3 of this seam has already been sewn, this part is easy. Pay attention that the two layers of fabric are smooth at the beginning and end of the zig zag baste, so you do not get puckers.

About neckbands. One of my favorite tips is to zig zag baste the raw edges of the seamed neckband together before attaching. If you want less bulk at the seam of the neckband, use your regular machine with a triple stitch to sew it in the round. The neckband is edge basted, and quartered, ready to attach.

Prepare your bodice the same by marking quarter marks. Wait, you say, there are more than four pins in this neckband! In order to have a smoother neckband, I like to pin about an inch for a child, maybe two for an adult on either side of the side pin. Keep this ratio closer to a one to one ratio, so that there is more neckband stretch at the center front and back curves. It helps to keep the dreaded shoulder puff on a tank or sleeveless top at bay, and helps to curve the center front and back just a little bit more.

Speaking of tanks. Here is a photo of the Virginia Tank and Stella Shorts that are part of this little capsule. I used the same method around the armscye and neckline to make for a smooth shoulder line, and curved neck and underarm.

My adorable little garden helper in a retro stripe Wanda. Planning more solids, and maybe a dress to go with all the summer outfits.

So many different and fun patterns to make up a great collection of summer play clothes. This post is filled with *affiliate links for favorite versions I have tested and wear in regular rotation. It is quite fulfilling to be able to make my favorite patterns for the newest generation in the family.

*Much appreciation for those that use my affiliate links. It costs you nothing and might generate a small commission from the designer to me. Thanks and Happy sewing!